11. May 2015 · Comments Off on London Marathon 2015: #thanksPaula #thankskathrine · Categories: Marathons, Race Report · Tags: , ,

Did you know that up until the first woman officially ran a marathon in 1967, it was believed that – point blank – no woman could run a marathon? That all that running might damage their reproductive organs?  That those organs might even just end up falling out, mid run?

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer entered the Boston Marathon as K.V. Switzer, the first woman to enter any marathon race.  She had trained for it and she was ready.  But just 4 miles into the 26.2, she was attacked by a race official trying to pull her off course:

kathrineswitzerjpg-ec5025f0e4eaf5d0

Kathrine managed to keep running and finished the marathon, despite shouts, jeers, and the press pestering her as she ran.  She writes today on her website, reflecting on the moments following the attack:

“…how scared I felt, as well as deeply humiliated, and for just a tiny moment, I wondered if I should step off the course. I did not want to mess up this prestigious race. But the thought was only a flicker. I knew if I quit, nobody would ever believe that women had the capability to run 26-plus miles. If I quit, everybody would say it was a publicity stunt. If I quit, it would set women’s sports back, way back, instead of forward. If I quit, I’d never run Boston.”

I ran the 2015 London Marathon thanks to Kathrine, and others like her.  My race didn’t go to plan.  In fact, it was one of the most disheartening races I’ve ever run, where nothing seemed to go quite right.  But nobody tried to pull me off course, and the only voice screaming at me to stop running was the one inside my head.

London marathon general

The start of this year’s London Marathon

Not only did I get to run the London Marathon again this year, but I had the enormous privilege of running it with Paula Radcliffe – world record holder of both the marathon and 10K (2:15:25 and 30:21), and six time world champion.  Paula is nothing short of phenomenal.  This year she ran London as her last hurrah, a goodbye to racing, and she ran it with the mere mortals rather than starting with the elites.  She has retired after so many years of willing her injured foot to cooperate, but she still managed to knock out 2:36:55 and (small wonder) placed 1st woman overall outside of the elites.  Is it worth mentioning that this was the slowest marathon she has ever run?

London Marathon Paula 2

Nobody says that women can’t run marathons anymore, and Paula only ran faster after going through pregnancy and giving birth to her children.  I say:  thank you, Kathrine.  Thank you, Paula.  You’ve shown us that ThisGirlCan.

37,584 people crossed the finish line at the London Marathon this year (if you’re interested, 38% women, 62% men) – and that doesn’t count those who started the race but didn’t finish.  I finished in 3:21:50, which was a disappointment, although still a PB.  I boiled myself over without realising it, running sub 7 minute miles early on in the game when I was meant to be doing 7:25 (let’s forget about Paula’s 5:10 min/mile here, ok?) and the rest of the run was pure drudgery, dragging myself to the finish line. It was cold, it was damp, I ran a stupid race, but – there is always next year.

London Marathon 2015 2

Sporting a 5Q tattoo, seeking gender equality in Ironman triathlon

It’s tough to train for months and then for things to go wrong.  Especially when it’s your own fault.  Last year I ran perfect splits, this year I got cocky and paid for it (from the 10 mile mark onwards!). I didn’t run the race that I wanted to run, but hey, I was only 502 spots behind Paula… on her worst day.  And on Paula’s worst day, she wore sunglasses

“to keep a lid on my emotions and they definitely hid some tears along the way.  Down the last mile I thought ‘I don’t care about the time’, I just wanted to thank as many people as I could.  I knew it would be emotional and it was so emotional. I nearly lost it at Birdcage Walk but the crowds bowled me over, I wanted it to last forever. It was so special, I’m really going to miss it. (BBC)

Despite what I was saying to myself as I ran down Birdcage Walk some 45 minutes behind Paula, this won’t be my last marathon, so I can still run the race I want to run, that I know I can run, next time.  I’m not retiring yet.

Screen Shot 2015-05-08 at 16.55.18

#thankspaula #thankskathrine #thisgirlcan (and thank you also Jacob Howe of London Heathside for helping me prepare for the marathon!)

Comments closed.